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Fond of someone

To save this word, you'll need to log in. Log In Definition of fond of 1 : having a liking for or love of someone or something : doing something a lot I'm fond of skiing. She grew quite fond of him. Learn More about fond of Share fond of Post the Definition of fond of to Facebook Share the Definition of fond of on Twitter Dictionary Entries near fond of fondlingly fondly fondness fond of fondue fondue fork fonduk. Accessed 24 Aug. Comments on fond of What made you want to look up fond of? Please tell us where you read or heard it including the quote, if possible. Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way. Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free! Is Singular 'They' a Better Choice?
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Log in Register. Search titles only. Search Advanced search…. Members Current visitors. Interface Language. Log in. Forums English Only English Only. JavaScript is disabled. For a better experience, please enable JavaScript in your browser before proceeding. Thread starter unconventional fruit Start date May 8,
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Log in Register. Search titles only. Search Advanced search…. Members Current visitors. Interface Language. Log in. Forums English Only English Only. JavaScript is disabled. For a better experience, please enable JavaScript in your browser before proceeding. Thread starter unconventional fruit Start date May 8, Hi all. What is the difference between "to be fond of" and "to love"? I know they mean almost the sam thing, but I was wandering which one is stronger or deeper. For example, can somebody "be fond of" a friend?

Or: can I say "I'm fond of my hausband"? Love is stronger and deeper. Is also "be fond of" something less serious, so to say, than "love"? They mean quiet different things. What Se16teddy says is correct.

To be fond of someone or something is to quiet like it. Whatever it is makes you comfortable and gives some pleasure. To say you love is more serious. Two things though: 1 You can use love loosely. I love chocolate, for example, is different to saying I have found my true love. Being fond for someone though does not, in itself, imply love. I hope this helps. Note that we use both word for inanimate objects as well. I'm afraid I can't understand -though- in which sense I can be fond of someone without loving it Look, what makes it confusing is that in everyday language we can say we 'love' something which is probably really to say we are fond of something not using it in the romantic sense.

If I say "I love chocolate", for example. This is quiet different to saying you love your partner. The other thing to keep in mind is that I don't think they are interchangable, 'to be fond of' has a more narrow meaning.

As I have already said for a thing it means it gives you sensual pleasure taste, visual or makes you comfortable. For a person it means you like aspects of their character, feel comfortable with them, value them and are a good friend or lover. Love is more than this and if used romantically means there is an attraction, more than physical, an intimacy and many things shared in common and perhaps a base of friendship. It could be defined differently. If you say "I'm rather fond of my husband", you should probably be looking for a new husband.

I'm fond of creme brulee. I'm fond of my aunty. I love my husband. If my husband said that he was "fond" of me, instead of "loved" me, I would be offended and hurt. This is interesting. Sometimes the two phrases can be used in a quite different way, yet the essential meanings of both are quite clear. For example, let's say that my family argues often, and members of my family say or do mean things. I would still love them have a life-long relationship with them and care about them , even though I might not like the things they do.

However, if I have a particular niece, nephew, or cousin that I like to spend time with, I could say that I'm quite fond of that niece, nephew, or cousin. I love care deeply about all the members of my family, but I am fond of actually enjoy spending time with one or two of them. ElbaArali New Member Spanish. English - South-East England. You're probably fond of all your friends. It would be difficult to be friendly with someone you weren't fond of.

You could be fond of other people too, without knowing them well enough to be friends. It's basically the same as 'like'. Actually saying to someone, 'I like you' or 'I'm fond of you' is a bit more risky. Some friends will understand it the right way 'Thank you, I like you too' , others might think you're implying more. English - British Southern England. If someone were to say that to me, I would be waiting for the 'but Thank you so much, entangledbank, for your quick response, and help as well.

Thanks also for your response tunaafi, I really appreciate it. You must log in or register to reply here.



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